Tuesday, March 21, 2017

1/8th Droop

Hello everyone,

The other day, I asked the #8realm on Facebook what they would like to see here on the Team Losi Racing blog. A good amount wanted to see how to measure droop and what droop does to our TLR 1/8th scale rides. For the measuring, see picture below.  You want to be as close to center on the shock screws and on the shock standoff, so as close as you can get.  As for what droop does, here is my take. More front droop increases off-power steering, it can increase rear grip, and gives the front less on-power grip. Less front droop gives more on-power steering and quicker steering reaction. More rear droop provides more grip in loose conditions and increases off-power/braking steering. Less rear droop takes rear grip away and is more stable on high grip. I would recommend making changes in your testing by .5mm increments and with the car on a car stand with tires on the car.
JR
#8realm

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

22 4.0,22-4 2.0, and 22T 3.0 carpet setups


Hello everyone,

Over the weekend, I attended the Extreme Carpet Initiative Race in Spring Hill, Tennessee with all three TLR rides (22 4.0,22-4 2.0, and 22T 3.0). This was my second year attending this event and it just keeps getting bigger; this year with close to 150 entries. The extreme crew set the track up on an indoor gym basketball court and the race brought racers in from surrounding states. I set my TLR 22 4.0 with help from the team and I would like to share what we came up and finished with after the event was over. For my TLR 22T 3.0 and 22-4 2.0, I used some knowledge from racing carpet before, and I installed some key items like TLR’s +3.5 hubs and different shock locations to help with the added grip of the Extreme RC Raceway track. Below are some links taking you to my setup’s:


TLR 22 4.0 setup

TLR 22T 3.0 setup

TLR 22-4 2.0 setup

JR
#22empire

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

8IGHT Platform Shock End installation and maintenance

Hi team,

  I wanted to give everyone a brief run through of our recommendation for installing and maintaining shock ends. While these components are often overlooked, their failure can be a very frustrating end to an otherwise great result on the track.
  The most important piece of information I can relay to you is ensuring you are getting the shock ends installed correctly.  The way that they are designed, they rely on the stalk of the shock shaft to engage and ‘interference fit’ the socket portion of the eyelet.  This is how they gain their strength in relation to the pivot ball.  If the shock shaft is threaded in incompletely, it is possible for the thread to wallow slightly, and weaken the formed threads to the point that the shock shaft can pull free from the eyelet in a moderate to severe impact.
  I have created a simple diagram demonstrating the correct shaft to eyelet engagement below.
  Maintaining your Shock Ends is actually quite simple.  I recommend every time the eyelets are removed from the shock shaft, for any reason, they are simply disposed of and replaced with fresh parts.  This way you can be confident that your race won’t be sabotaged by a $2 part.
  When installed completely/correctly, your shock ends can last indefinitely, but once they are removed from the shock shaft and reinstalled, this is when the formed threads in the eyelet can become compromised and offer less than perfect engagement, thus lowering the reliability substantially.



Brian Kinney

TLR  

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

22 4.0 Turf/Carpet

Hello everyone,

Last week was the debut of TLR’s 22 4.0 2wd buggy kit. We’ve seen it in its dirt laydown and standup form, but I wanted to take a second and show everyone it in its Turf/Carpet form. This coming weekend I’m off to Spring Hill, Tennessee for the JConcepts Extreme Carpet Initiative race where I’ll be racing my TLR 22 4.0 in its Turf/Carpet configuration. Be sure to like and follow Team Losi Racing on FaceBook for Videos and Pictures from this weekend's event.
These items below I have installed and come with the TLR 22 4.0 kit:
Diff at +3 with +3 rear hubs
Battery all the way forward
Molded HRC front pivot
Front spindles all the way up with 2mm trail
Front axles spaced out

JR Mitch
#22empire

Monday, March 6, 2017

8 2.0 EU body (LOSA8093) back in stock!

We just brought back the Team Losi Racing 8IGHT 2.0 EU Body back into stock after a lot of requests. This 1/8 nitro body offers a traditional cab design with a sleek fin running down the middle of the cab. Drivers have stated that it has a better balance of steering and traction when using this body. Below is a picture of Reno Savoya's 8IGHT 4.0 with the 8 2.0 EU body.

Photo: Compliments of Neobuggy.net.

Monday, February 27, 2017

22 3.0 & 4.0 CVA's

Hello everyone,

This week I would like to talk about the very minimal, but very important 1mm axle spacer on our TLR 22 line of vehicles. This spacer for me has been a very beneficial tuning option in all types of track conditions. We asked TLR driver, JP Richards to give us his thoughts on the spacer and its use; “I think it gives the car more drive/forward grip out of the corner. It also reduces the roll in the corners as it seems to bind the drivetrain up. It’s something I always run on low to medium bite tracks. The higher the bite, the more it will bind the car up and kill corner speed.” Thanks for the insight on this tuning option and good luck at this week’s Chi-Town Shootout.

JR
#22empire

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

22 3.0: JP Richards Setup Changes at Motorama

Hey Everyone,

In this post I'm gonna talk about some of the setup changes I made to my TLR 22 3.0 buggy and TLR 22T 3.0 truck while at Motorama to accommodate the slightly looser track conditions.

In the case of Motorama this past weekend, I was told we were going to be running an outdoor pin style tire. So I made sure my stand up transmission was in both of my 3.0 vehicles. I went with my normal stand up setup on both cars. After my first practice runs, I decided the first change needed was to lighten the shock oil up in the car front and rear to get the car to settle in the track more and go through the bumps better. Lighter oil will help the car transfer weight to the rear of the car a little quicker and increase the rebound speeds to help get through bumps better. In my buggy I went from 35 front and 30 rear, to 32.5 front 27.5 rear and my truck I went from 35 to 32.5 in the front and 27.5 to 25 in the rear. This gave me that extra weight transfer needed for the car to produce more overall traction.

I also increased the rear toe-in on both cars from 3.0 degrees to 3.5 degrees to get a little more overall traction out of the cars.

Attached are both of my TQ and Winning setups from this past weekend.

JP Richards
#22empire